Interview with Health Coach and Herbalist Jennifer Capestany

Editor’s Note: If you watch the video instead of reading the edited transcript and recipe at bottom, Jennifer said to be sure to tell you that she forgot a very important ingredient in the fire cider: Onions! So dice 1/2 an onion or so (depending on the size and your preference) and add that to your fire cider jar.

LeAura:
Hi this is LeAura Alderson with Gardens All, here today with one of our favorite herbalists Jennifer Capestany. Welcome Jennifer!

Jennifer:
Thank you! Happy to be here.

LeAura:
Jennifer is a contributing expert writer, for GardensAll.com and her speciality is that she is an herbalist and a natural health consultant specializing in rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disease, digestive disorders and chronic illness. Jennifer owns Prairie Hawk Botanica… I love your slogan Jennifer it’s ‘for gentle healing rooted in nature’.

home remedies for colds and flu

Jennifer:
Yes!

LeAura:
That’s excellent! Your website is really beautiful too. That’s PrairieHawkBotanica.com1)http://www.PrairieHawkBotanica.com and Jennifer’s Facebook page is also Prairie Hawk Botanica so you can find her that way as well.

LeAura:
Jennifer is just a wealth of knowledge and she’s one of those people who lives what she teaches because she had to, in fact that began her journey. Let me just share with folks what we are going to talk about and we’ll get back to you sharing how you get involved and then we will get on to the nitty gritty of the subject.

So today we are going to talk about easy remedies you can make at home.

Kitchen Cabinet Cold and Flu remedies

  • Cold and flu herbs most people already have on hand in their spice cabinet
  • Cold and flu herbs that grow well indoors
  • How to make ‘Fire Cider’ (it’s easy!)
  • How to make a quick facial stream for stuffy noses
  • How to deal with the chronic cough or chest congestion that can come from colds and flu

Jennifer’s Story of Healing Through Herbs

LeAura:
So those are the things we plan to touch on but let’s first learn a little bit about who Jennifer is. Jennifer lives in, a homeschooling mom and an avid gardener, in addition to being an herbalist. So tell us a little bit about your background, where you are, your parenting and also how you got started?

Jennifer:
Ok well, as you know I’m in North Texas, so that’s close to Dallas, the upper north-eastern corner of it. A very temperate region with a long growing season, I once had a growing season of seven on the map and it’s more like growing season eight these days.

Let me see, my journey to being an herbalist and finding my calling probably started about thirteen years ago when my second child, my daughter, was born. I didn’t know it at the time what was on the horizon but I started to have little aches and pains especially in my hands and my elbows and just started to have a little bit of digestive issues. Which I really at the time, like most of us, deep into a full time job, trying to parent, trying to home school and so thought it was just because I was burning the candle at both ends as they say. And I had a very typing job so as the pain increased over the years I thought I had carpal tunnel syndrome, I didn’t really connect anything. I began to have stomach pains which I thought at the time was heartburn, I didn’t suffer from heartburn much (laughter) so I didn’t recognise what it was. I found excuses and tried to ignore it. As the years went on and we moved to Texas, about a decade ago, it started getting really bad. I would wake up in the morning and be so stiff that I would have to hobble up out of bed.

LeAura:
So let me ask, so where were you when it started? You weren’t in Texas yet?

Jennifer:
At the time I was living in Connecticut and about a decade ago a job transfer had us coming out to Texas and we love it here so much.

LeAura:
So the story you’re unfolding is like, it’s one of those things where it was getting worse and worse, but because you were living in it, it was a little bit harder perhaps to recognise exactly how bad it was getting.

JC:
Yeah, you recognise the pain of childbirth because it happens kind of all of a sudden (laughter) but this kind of pain, when it comes to chronic illness and such, you rationalise, you find excuses and you justify it in a way because you get used to it as you go on. That’s definitely what happened to me, I got used to unbelievable amounts of pain.

I just got used to unbelievable amounts of pain.

LeAura:
Wow! Again, it’s hard to know what you’re missing and how bad you feel when you forget how good it feels to feel great. Were you checking in with regular doctors?

Medical Misdiagnosis

Jennifer:
At the time I did. When the pain began to get really bad, especially in my hands, I went to my regular doctor and they sent me to a sports doctor. The sports doctor said ‘you have trigger finger’. I didn’t have trigger finger but this is what I thought at the time and so I’m rubbing sports cream into my hands and trying to just control the pain. No one had very good answers and then the pain was kind of just where your liver is—you know where I’m going with this—it started to get very severe. It started to get to a point where I could hardly eat anything without these pains coming.

Ailments Jennifer Experienced Before Herbal Healing

  • Stomach Pain
  • Digestive Issues
  • Aching hands
  • Aching elbows
  • Aching feet
  • Pain from eating in the area of the liver

Herbal home remedies

Jennifer:
So back to the doctor. By this time I was in my mid thirties and I had been living with this increasingly growing pain for some years and only then when they finally did some more testing and had to remove my gall bladder which turned out to be full of stones.

LeAura:
Wow!

Jennifer:
Which was causing the pain and making it so that I could hardly digest the food that I was eating.

LeAura:
Right.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Jennifer:
And the diagnosis for rheumatoid arthritis came through and like I said, I had to be about thirty-five at the time, my hands were engaged in pain, by that time my elbows, my knees, my toes. I remember being nearly in tears in the doctor’s office, asking, “Who’s toes hurt?” It was just dreadful.

LeAura:
Especially in the early days, were you tempted to attribute any part of it to, ‘I’m getting older, you know now I’m in my mid-30s, maybe this is what it means’.

Jennifer:
Oh yeah. Between the two children I had put on some weight and so I was very fond of blaming any health problems that I had to the extra weight that I was carrying around. Of course that can lead to many health problems but it wasn’t an adequate excuse but absolutely yeah. Anything I could grab as an excuse I did. “I’m getting older”, certainly played into that. Although when you’re in your 30s that only works so far, as it’s hard to justify.

Then I visited a rheumatologist and found out some of the medications I would have to take in order to control the rheumatoid arthritis. They test your blood and they test your—what they call RH factor—and it was through the roof for me. I believe normal levels are between 14 and 15, mine was 177.

LeAura:
What does that mean? Did you say RA factor?                

Jennifer:
Yes, the test for rheumatoid arthritis factor in your bloodstream, which since it’s an autoimmune disease in nature they can test for these things. They can test for these things by testing your blood and I was just severely ill. It was just nuts and when I found out the medications that I would have to take, it was pretty terrifying to me. Immunosuppressants, western medicine doesn’t have a good answer for these chronic auto immune disorders, all they really know how to do is to tap down the reaction by suppressing your immune system.

Terrified and Helpless

I learned I would have to take what’s known as a cancer drug, in much smaller amounts than an oncologist would give to a cancer patient, but I would have to take it regularly. Also the anti-inflammatories, to try and drive down the pain, occasional steroids when the pain got too bad and the cancer methotrexate, is what it’s known, that’s where you first start, your first immune suppressant you get. It would absolutely damage my liver, they would have to monitor my liver to ensure that the damage wasn’t so much that my liver couldn’t keep up with it and I was just terrified by that.

LeAura:
And is that is such a feeling as helplessness!

I didn’t want to live a life on pills.

Jennifer:
It really is. You feel like you’re at the top of a very slippery slope and once you take that slope there’s not anyway to get back up again. That is truly how I felt, it was terrifying. So right around then all the love of plant medicine that I had put aside… had let life interfere with, kicked in. I started thinking there has to be a better way there has to be something that I did to cause this and therefore something that I can do to try and dial it back.

From Traditional to Naturopathic Doctors to Herbs

Rheumatologists, didn’t really want to work with me at all, they just said ‘nope’ the only thing you can do is take these drugs but it’s a good idea to eat more fruit and vegetables. That was insulting and that’s when we left the Rheumatologist’s office and instead chose to see a naturopathic doctor and that lead me onto my journey.

That was insulting. we left the rheumatologist’s office and sought out a naturopath.

To learn about how to eat properly, mistakes that I had made and symptoms that I had ignored like leaky gut. How to restore those things and how to return to a more traditional way of eating. And it was in that journey somewhere along the way that I realised I really could use someone like a ‘me’ now, when I was going through that process.

LeAura:
Exactly.

Jennifer:
Someone who was willing to coach me through all of the pain, the anxiety, trying to balance the allopathic medicines with the natural interventions as you try to taper off of one. It was very, very confusing.

LeAura:
Yeah because you almost need a scientist because you know how we as human organisms are an organic experiment in a way, there are certain things that we know can cause, contribute and help and harm but to what degree, to what extent and whoever it may be, can vary. For instance my daughter and I have both suffered from candida and also allergies to soy, and the manifestation of symptoms is very different for both of us and yet it’s the same cause. So I can appreciate where allopathic medicine, or even naturopathic medicine can have a hard time with diagnosing. Especially since they tend to isolate but back to the holistic practitioner, you’re looking at the whole mechanism, the whole organism.

Jennifer:
Yeah and it’s a good point you just made there. Even naturopathic medicine can go down that road and make the mistake of attempting to just treat the symptoms without looking at that person as the unique, shining human being that they are and their genetics and their environmental factors. And putting all of that into play it really takes that to bring someone who is very ill back to health.

LeAura:
So now, knowing what you know and looking back, I’m sure that there are people, like you said, working with you now who had some similar things to what you had. Now you know what you could prescribe to help them significantly, much faster. But, back to the original diagnosis, what would you say or is there a primary contributing cause to what began the cascade of events in your body.

Jennifer:
In my case, again pointing to the individuality, I believe that the rheumatoid arthritis, as it usually is, was a symptom of a larger problem. Almost always when it comes to these autoimmune disorders, you need to be looking at your gut health.

When it comes to autoimmune disorders, you need to look at your gut health.

Your immune system, your nervous system, your digestive system are so interconnected and there’s always a brain gut connection to these autoimmune disorders and so I had suffered from gut permeability, leaky gut as it’s commonly called, for years. I just didn’t have any idea.

LeAura:
Did candida precede that? Because I’ve been reading that often candida leads to leaky gut or was it something different? Do you know?

Jennifer:
It can and that’s usually having to do with environmental factors, most of it is just a poor diet. But in my case, I believe, that it had to do with headaches. I had been a tension headache and migraine sufferer, my goodness, since I was very young, a child and when I hit my teen years we went to the doctor for it because it started to become a problem for school. The doctor said, ‘oh just take ibuprofen’ and I would be taking ibuprofen like crazy for these headaches.  I still have trouble although I’ve found a lot of my triggers, I’m still a headache prone person and if I get stressed out you know exactly how I’m going to react, it’s going to come to my head.

LeAura:
And by the way I’ve been reading things recently, like ibuprofen could of actually contributed to your gallstones.

Jennifer:
Oh yes, the gallstones, also contribute to the degradation of your intestinal lining which leads to Rheumatoid Arthritis. This is what I believe my track was.

LeAura:
But backing up to the headaches, so that’s what caused a leaky gut but what was the cause of the headaches? I get that some people manifest feeling ill in different ways, like my son for instance. We always know when he’s coming down with something because he gets a headache. It always begin with his head too. That’s different than being predisposed to migraines and chronic headaches, right?

Jennifer:
Yeah, I think for those of us who suffer from headaches, especially if it’s been kind of a lifelong thing, there are lots of factors you could look at but genetics is certainly part of it. I do seem to be quite predisposed to developing headaches, it’s a stress response for me. Just as you said if I’m going to get ill, oh headache! I believe there could be some physiological genetic connections there but it could also be certain toxicities. If you have lead levels or mercury levels in your brain, which you could of even received from mom in utero, then these things can certainly aggravate the situation. Conditions like migraines, headaches and such. In fact there have already been links made between heavy metal toxicity and migraine issues. If you’re someone suffering from headaches to have to kind of consider all those factors not just the the food triggers or environmental triggers, I inherited genetically or have I been exposed to something I have to detox out?

(15.45)

LeAura:
Yeah definitely. So then you discovered it was your leaky gut.

Jennifer:
It was the leaky gut, Rheumatoid Arthritis and pain. 

Herbs and Spices for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Editor’s Note: Jennifer says the heavy hitter best herbs she used for Rheumatoid Arthritis are: Turmeric, ginger, white willow bark, along with nutritive herbs like stinging nettle.

Additionally, cinnamon, black pepper, garlic and green tea are additional recommendations from EverydayHealth.com.2)http://www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/diet/six-herbs-and-spices-for-rheumatoid-arthritis/#01

Beneficial Herbs for Arthritis

LeAura:
Ok so as you began the journey of healing and turning back to plants and all that. From the process of diving into that world for your own healing, seemed like a natural fit to then dive into it as an eventual profession as well.

Jennifer:
It did, it was one of those things where the clouds part and the sun beams down and I realise this is what I’m supposed to be doing. It only took the RA to get me here.

LeAura:
Well there you go. I mean we didn’t get her attention with the carpal tunnels symptoms so we are trying to get her attention… what will it take! Right. By the way, I forgot to ask you, how many children do you have?

Jennifer:
Two, I have two wonderful children. A seventeen year old son and a thirteen year old daughter.

LeAura
Nice!

Jennifer:
Yeah, both here and home schooled all of their lives so it’s been fun, an alternative family, type journey.

LeAura:
Yeah the same with us. Well our kids did go to two different private schools at two different junctures in their lives and that was a good experience but the home schooling was by far the best for all of us.

Jennifer:
Its challenging but worth it.

LeAura:
Absolutely, every second of it. So let’s go to now, talking about the topic of the day. The herbs and treatment, ok let’s see now what we are going to start with. Shall we start with cold and flu herbs that most people already have on hand in their spice cabinet?

Kitchen Cabinet Remedies for Colds and Flu

Jennifer:
OK let me see, cold and flu herbs. When it comes to cold and flu you really do have quite a lot of herbs, either growing in your garden already or in your spice cabinet that can help you. Sage comes to (Dog barking) Sorry! That was our dog.

LeAura:
We have dog alarms here too so don’t worry. (laughter)

Jennifer:
You hush! (to the dogs)

LeAura
It’s real life (laughter)

Natural Remedy for Colds and Flu

Jennifer:
(Laughter) It really is, my goodness! One of the first herbs that comes to mind is sage. Most of us have a jar of sage kicking around. Fresh is always better but if all you have is dry, go ahead and use that.

Sage Honey: Expectorant, Sore Throats, Coughs

You can take your sage and combine it with raw honey to make a really nice remedy for colds, flus, especially those coughs that can plague people sometimes when they have cold and flus because those two combined can be really, really soothing to this area (pointing to throat). Which can get so painful and the spasms can cause other problems as time goes on if you keep doing it and it can also help to make that cough more productive.

So you would basically take a jar, where’s my fire cider jar? You would take it, fill it up about as high as you can, if you have fresh sage. If you have dry, only fill it up to about half way, there’s no need to fill it all the way up to the top, that’s over kill. Then you take your raw honey and fill it up.

sage-honey-remedy-for-sore-throat

LeAura:
So basically the ratio, and the same thing with cooking, if it’s dry herbs you use half the amount of fresh herbs basically.

Jennifer:
That is correct. There’s no real mystery with that. If you take a fresh sprig of any herb you like and you dry it, what’s that going to look like in your hand? It’s going to look tiny, a little teaspoon and so of course you need less of it. That’s the reasoning behind that one. So that’s one way that you can make a very quick remedy, let that sit for two weeks and you have made an herbal honey.

LeAura:
Ok so wait a second. So we pack the jar with either half of dry or all of fresh sage. Do you put the whole sprig in or do you just remove the leaves?

Jennifer:
Usually, I will take a pair of snips like these (brings out scissors) and I’ll just give those leaves a quick snipping as their going into the jar.

LeAura:
So stems and all, is ok? Correct?

Jennifer:
Stems and all is ok. There’s not a heck of a lot of medicine in the stems, their kind of woody.

LeAura:
Yeh ok, so basically just the leaves then. So you basically remove the leaves.

Jennifer:
Yeh!

LeAura:
So let’s say that we have either our half dried or whole fresh, snipped if it’s fresh because the dried is already crumbled up. And then what did you add? How much honey did you add and what else?

Jennifer:
Enough to cover the herb.

LeAura:
Ok so that’s a lot of honey!

Jennifer:
That can be a lot of honey, absolutely, and it will last you a long time. You will put the lid on that and let it sit for two weeks but don’t ignore it. You know, you want to look at it, every couple of days and just make sure that the herb is beneath the level of the honey. If it’s not, get a chap stick and poke it back down (laughter). Get it under there, otherwise you could have issues of moulding and you don’t want that.

LeAura:
Right okay, and so the two weeks is basically infusing the honey, the sage is infusing the honey with its essence.

Jennifer:
That’s correct. Honey doesn’t take as long to infuse as some other medium, like vinegar and oil that come to mind. Honey is pretty quick. In fact even three days into steeping your herbal honey, if you feel that flu or cold coming on, you can dip into your sage and honey, that’s ok. You’ll basically take that, take a big table spoon or dollop of it, dump it into a cup and pour some boiling water onto it and stir that around. You have a basic medicinal tea right there.

LeAura: So simple, right?! Sage is such a simple herb to grow.

Jennifer:
It’s very easy. In fact there’s a video on one of the articles that we have put up together on GardensAll on cold and flu where the very esteemed herbalist, Susun Weed, shows how to make sage honey. It was a very nice visual and it was in one of those articles, I’m sure of it.

Editor’s Note: Here’s the article with the video by herbalist Susun Weed.3)https://www.gardensall.com/3-ingredient-herbal-teas-for-colds-and-flu/

LeAura:
We will link to that I’m sure. Great, ok fantastic.

Jennifer:
And so that’s an easy one and sage is very easy to grow, it tends to be nice and shrubby.

LeAura:
In fact it grows pretty well into the fall, I don’t remember about winter. Does it die back a little bit?

Jennifer:
It depends on where you are. Here in Texas, it’s pretty temperate where I am and we will get that sage staying in leaf for a really long time into the winter. If the winter is severe it might lose its leaves. I have had some years where it’s just kept on going. By the way don’t pull it up, there’s a good chance it will re-flush come the spring and you’ll have sage again.

Editor’s Note: We trim our sage back and it grows heartily every year. Sage is a perennial in zones 5-8.4)https://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-sage/

LeAura:
Definitely. Ok except for the honey because honey can be more expensive but it’s a lot less expensive than some of the medicines that you can buy like cough syrups and stuff and so much better for you.

Jennifer:
Yeah and raw honey is fine, organic if you must. If you’re going to heat it up, it certainly isn’t raw anymore once you’ve added boiling water to it and so if you must organic honey is ok. I do tend to keep a nice big jar of raw around for medicine and sweetening.

Best Herbs to Grow Indoors

LeAura:
Fantastic. Ok so the next one is cold and flu herbs that grow well indoors. Now since you live in a temperate climate do you still grow some indoors?

Jennifer:
There’s not much need (laughter) for me, I’m pretty spoiled here. When it stays this temperate there’s not much need but when it comes to growing herbs indoors, you can grow just about any plant so long as you give it what it needs. So when it comes to herbs the more shallow rooted the plant is, the easier it is going to be to grow indoors. So what comes to mind is oregano, mint of course, cilantro, basil, are all a good choices to try to grow indoors.

Best herbs for pots

 

 

Good Light

Make sure it has a good light source, preferably a southern exposure window. If you don’t have a good sunny window, get a good grow light.5)https://www.gardensall.com/7-best-grow-lights-for-avid-gardeners/

Good Soil

Make sure it has a good six to twelve inches of soil in your pot.

Good Pot

Don’t skimp on the pot size. 

Good Food

Feed it a little food once in awhile and a little water.

Most herbs are pretty tough. You can probably keep those growing through the winter. Catnip, I didn’t mention that one, that’s another good herb to grow indoors and it usually grows well in a pot.

Rosemary and sage, you can certainly try but those are two that really want to be big. Sage wants to be a shrub of maybe twelve inches high and about as wide. Rosemary wants to a four and half foot beast (laughter).

LeAura:
So in a big pot, in a nice sunny window if you have it.

Jennifer:
Make sure it has a lot of soil under there so that it can spread and feel like it has room to grow. If you’re going to grow more of those shrubbier kind of herbs make sure to give them lots of space or they’re going to be angry at you.

LeAura:
And I just heard, I wish I remember the source I will look for it in the listed article notes, are you familiar with blue zones around the world? The blue zones are those zones in the world where people tend to live to be older, like octogenarians, nonagenarians and centenarians, who live to be over a hundred years old. And one of the areas was a place in Italy and one of the reasons it attributed to that is that they consumed lots of rosemary every day. As a culture, in teas, in food, everything they make.

Editor’s Note: The Italian “blue zone” is Acciaroli, Italy. Much of their longevity is attributed to lots of walking and daily consumption of rosemary. Rosemary is beneficial to memory, blood circulation and nervous system. 6)http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/this-delicious-herb-might-be-why-the-italians-live-so-long_us_56fd677ce4b0daf53aef1df1

Another Italian Blue Zone, in fact, the first blue zone identified, is on the island of Sardinia, Italy, a remote area with a traditional way of life.7)https://www.bluezones.com/exploration/sardinia-italy/

Jennifer: In oils, yeah. It’s a fantastic herb. Probably because it’s so loaded with antioxidants. It has a lot of really good anti-aging properties and has been linked to helping with memory issues and even has been linked, a little bit, to people suffering with dementia.

LeAura:
There you go. In fact I heard it on the Ben Greenfield podcast, so I will link that as well.8)https://bengreenfieldfitness.com/2016/10/episode-361-full-transcript/

The thing is that sort of boggles the mind is that when you get into natural medicine, when you get into recognising that, ‘oh of course’ our food is meant to be our medicine. Our herbs—our medicine—is so much cheaper. Even buying supplements, you know growing a rosemary plant is so much cheaper than buying rosemary capsules or sage cough remedy.

Jennifer:
Oh you know it so true and you learn how to better work with it and make it part of your everyday life. Now I’m not adverse to using capsules, there are tons and I am working with various clients and I do have them use capsule supplements because it makes sense to get specific amount in them. But go ahead and imagine picking up one of those pills, empty it into your palm. How much is there? Maybe half a teaspoon.

LeAura:
How much is there? Yeah.

Jennifer:
Crushed powder herb, there’s not much going on in there. So when you’re working with these herbs and making them a part of your everyday life, your tea, your food, your medicine, you’re going to get a lot more of those properties.

rosemary-for-health-and-longevity

LeAura:
And it’s that ongoing maintenance, that we are injecting these things regularly that can make a difference.

Jennifer:
Just to connect it back to gardening, rosemary is also a really good choice because it’s a good landscaping plant, did I mention that mine is a big four and a half foot tall beast. It looks a lot like an evergreen shrub and so it’s a workshop that I like to teach on form and function… plants that are pretty but are also functional for either food or medicine.

Rosemary for form and function, looks like a nice evergreen shrub in a yard garden… but you can eat it!

LeAura:
Yeh, absolutely! Oh my gosh we should do another session on that because it’s one of our popular topics and articles on Gardens All, is the concept of front yard gardens that look nice enough, that homeowner associations will not complain.

Jennfier:
That way you’re having to trick your neighbours into thinking it’s just a pretty plant and not also functional, yeah that’s it exactly. Rosemary’s on that list because it makes for a nice anchoring evergreen shrub but you can eat it! (Laughter)

LeAura:
Nice! Definitely, we’ll have to go check on our rosemary. My husband is more the gardener than me because I’ve just been focused more on the indoor website part of it, article writing part of it but I’m going to get out there too, more often because I love it. I have always grown plants and I look forward to that. That’s the thing, all I have grown is houseplants but it wasn’t until in more recent years that I thought, duh, why don’t we grow plants that actually have edible, medicinal benefits. You know, like what you’re saying, instead of a shrub, let’s put a plant there that has a function beyond just beauty.

So we talked about the indoor plants and now we’re going to talk about how to make fire cider.

What’s all the Fuss About Fire Cider?


Jennifer:
Ok let me see, fire cider is another easy one. You’ve also heard it called ‘Master Tonic’ and it was probably made most famous by herbalist Rosemary Gladstar, who shared her recipe for fire cider and oh my goodness, twenty years ago!

LeAura:
No it was more than that, it was in the nineteen-seventies.

Jennifer:
Yeh, it was a long time ago was when she first shared her recipe for fire cider and again I have also heard it called ‘Master Tonic’ but basically it’s just a combination of vegetable, herbs and roots that you can find in your garden or around your house pretty readily.

Fire cider is just a combination of vegetables, herbs and roots that you can find in your garden and around your house.

Making an extract out of it that turns it into a very focused remedy to not only get over a cold and flu more quickly but also perhaps, prevent it. Say if you take a teaspoon of it a day through the season when most people, or you know when the flus and colds are kind of going around. And you don’t drink it! I know it’s called cider or tonic but if you drink a glass of fire cider you’re going to be sad. Even people who don’t get heartburn, might get one with this! It’s meant to be taken by the spoonful and that’s why I have a nice big bowl here and I’m going to hold it up for my cam to show what I’ve been running around, for about an hour or so, gathering.

Take fire cider by the spoonful, or blend it with food, such as salad dressing and stir fry.

LeAura:
Oh, how wonderful!

See Jennifer’s complete fire cider recipe below.

Editor’s Note: We’ve posted the entire recipe at the end of this article, for your convenience, or you can click straight to it here if you want to bypass the conversation details: How to Make Fire Cider.

 

homemade remedies for cold and flu
Jennifer Capestany’s Fire Cider Recipe – Ingredients

Jennifer:
This is a flexible recipe. So here’s what I grabbed and tossed in a bowl:

Add:

  • Rosemary (couple of sprigs)
  • Sage
  • Jalapeños
  • Chipotle peppers (ok to sub with sweet peppers for kids and others who can’t tolerate hot)

The hot chilli peppers are probably more medicinal however if you just can’t take them or if you have chronic heartburn issues which are exasperated by that capsaicin in hot peppers then fine, go sweet.

Add:

  • Ginger root
  • Horseradish – this little gnarly beauty
  • Garlic

Good old garlic, highly antimicrobial and antiviral, antifungal and everything. (Laughter) There’s nothing garlic can’t do.

Add:

  • Sweet basil

I also put it in a jar of water because it’s [basil is] resentful of being cut and stuck on a table, this is sweet basil and over here we have cute little catnip. You can see all those fuzzy leaves which is not going to go in the fire cider but it’s cute. Catnip is another flu remedy and we will talk about what you can do with catnip if we have time.

Editor’s Note: Jennifer also wrote about catnip’s medicinal and mosquito repellent qualities in this article. 9)https://www.gardensall.com/natural-mosquito-repellent-medicinal-catnip/

Relaxing herbs may not get along with stimulating herbs.

I do not normally include it in fire cider because, as we talked about in the article where we also named it as a great flu remedy since it is, you know that catnip in humans tends to be a relaxant. Well that means it will argue a little bit with the rosemary which tends to, energetically speaking, they have kind of different focuses and so I tend to try and not put these two in the same jar, herbs that are going to argue with each other.

LeAura:
That’s a good point!

Maximize the medicinal qualities of garlic by letting it sit for a couple minutes after cutting or crushing.

Jennifer:
So here’s the garlic which I forgot to whack, the garlic is one of those where you can maximize the amount of medicine that you’re getting in your garlic if you just cut it and let it sit for a couple of minutes. You give it a chance to produce as much of the alkaloid, that’s mostly medicinal in the garlic which will then degrade actually into other compounds but that’s ok that’s what it’s supposed to do. You go ahead and let that sit for a few minutes, so if you’re me and you’re lazy you just whack the snot out of it with the flat of your blade. (laughter)

Garlic for cold and flu

Add:
Couple cloves of crushed or minced garlic

LeAura:
(Laughter) What a fancy blade you have!

Jennifer:
(Laughter) This was a Christmas present and I absolutely love it! So basically what I did was whack the bejeezus out of this poor clove of garlic, you can mince it if you like but if you’re lazy like me you won’t do that and into a mason jar, you will stick all this fun stuff. I’m going to dump in the garlic, normally this is a pint size. I normally put two cloves of garlic, I like garlic, which is highly medicinal. Into that I’m also going to dump the horseradish root, now I chopped that up earlier because if anyone has ever had an occasion to chop up horseradish root, you know how really aromatic it is (laughter). It’s pretty stinky, I think the house still smells a bit. Into the jar I just dumped about a two inch piece of horseradish.

LeAura:
Which is about a tablespoon, probably once it’s done. Maybe two tablespoons?

Add:
1.5 Tablespoons of chopped horseradish

Jennifer:
I would say about a tablespoon and a half, I just took about the tip of your second finger, is all it takes. If you don’t have access to horseradish root, that’s ok, go get horseradish sauce and just take a big dollop of it and dump it in the jar. Although goodness the organic market usually has horseradish so you could try there.

LeAura:
It grows really well! At least ours has done really well.

Jennifer:
A lot of people don’t think to try to grow horseradish but it is pretty easy to grow you know but just be aware when you cut into that thing, woo! (Laughter) Here’s ginger, this is probably about two tablespoons and into the jar.

Add:
2 Tablespoons chopped ginger

LeAura:
I’ve been thinking about cooking recipes and the thing that gets confusing to me on ginger is that it might say a two inch piece but it depends if that two inch piece happens to be an inch circumference or two inch circumference.

Relax. Don’t get fussy about this. Measurements are approximate and ingredients are flexible.

Jennifer:
And the beauty when it comes to herbal medicine, you know I say this a lot, in fact I should put it after ‘gentle healing rooted in nature’ is, don’t get fussy about this! I find myself saying that a lot, you know a good chunk of ginger. Again, that’s about half inch in diameter and about two inches long, that’s plenty. If I was making a quart sized jar, I would probably double that amount. And it’s the same, you will take your peppers and give them a rough chop. The more you increase surface area of the vegetables, now that’s a nice lovely jalapeño.

Add:
Peppers, roughly chopped

LeAura:
Ah beautiful. It almost looks like it’s a nice store bought, plastic kind because it looks so perfect.

Jennifer:
This is gorgeous! Ah I’m glad you said that because that reminds me to say that you should really get organic, as much as possible. If you’re going to purchase your vegetables or your herbs remember that you’re making an extract and if you’re using oil, vinegar, vodka or whatever your using, you’re going to be extracting out a lot of the properties that’s in that veg. I don’t trust that you can wash off all of the pesticides.

LeAura:
No you can’t. It’s got to be in the cellular structure.

Jennifer:
Exactly! You know I read somewhere it gets in apples and you can’t even get it out. So it’s true for so more vegetables and so if your budget is super tight and you have to pick and choose, when you’re making an extract of any kind or a ferment, really try to get organic.

LeAura:
Yeah, we look at the extra we spend on organic as being preventive medicine and prescription. You know it’s better than spending money down the road on prescriptions.

Jennifer:
Absolutely! Yeah it really is, I just pointed that out to someone the other day. Someone who had thyroid issues, who was moaning about what it was going to take to reverse the thyroid immune portion of the thyroid disease. I pointed out exactly what you were saying, well let’s look at what it will be like down the road if you do nothing.

LeAura:
Yeah, exactly!

Add:
Handful of Fresh Sage, chopped (or half as much dried)

Jennifer:
So now, I’ve given my sage a bit of a chop, I just roughly chopped some leaves. Can you mince them? Yeh but if you’re lazy like me, you won’t.

LeAura:
I can’t even imagine you being anything remotely like lazy. I would just say you’re being efficient (laughter).

Add:
Basil

Jennifer:
Efficient is a good word, yes (laughter). If your efficient like me, you just give these leaves a rough chop and into the jar. So you can see that’s starting to fill up nicely, I am going to try and fill it all the way to the top since it’s all fresh stuff. I’m going to put some basil in there and the same thing, you know the trick about getting the leaves off the sprig by going backwards down the plant. The stem of my basil is very stemy so we’re going to pummel that. Into the jar, see no fuss. Very, very easy. This is so wonderful, here’s the rosemary from the beast in the back yard. These are two springs for my pint sized jar that looks plenty enough. One looks like it’s about six inches long and the other one four.

Add:
Rosemary – 2 healthy sprigs, snipped

LeAura:
Two healthy sprigs.

Jennifer:
Two healthy sprigs. I better use my snips for this job. You know when you go to buy a rosemary plant or you buy some from the market, it has a very soft look to those needles. What happens is the next year you plant your rosemary, those needles transform into something that looks a little more piney. They toughen up. That’s ok you can still use it but you might have to do like I did and get your snips out because they do get a little tougher.

LeAura:
Did you scrape those from the stem as well or did you just snip it and leave it on the stem?

Jennifer:
I just snipped it and left it on the stem. Its efficiency (laughter).

LeAura:
(Laughter) There you go!

Add:
Chipotle

Jennifer:
I’ve got a little more room here so I’m going to add in some of the cute little chipotle that I scrambled out of the garden this morning. Good old Texas, we still have a pepper harvest and I did actually put the tops in.

LeAura:
So you put the stem in as well?

Jennifer:
The shoulder I believe it’s called.

LeAura:
Does it have nutritional value, is that why you’re doing it? Or is it because you don’t want to waste it?

Jennifer:
Well when you’re cooking the shoulder of the pepper gets cut off and that gets put in the composter because how are you going to really eat that? But when you’re making something like an extract, that you’re going to strain the vegetables and the herbs away from the liquid and then just use the liquid, it hardly matters.

LeAura:
Right.

Jennifer:
Into the jar it went.

LeAura:
Well how about seeds? How about pepper seeds, were those removed or are they in there as well?

Add:
Organic apple cider vinegar, (with “the mother” still in it). Fill to cover.

Jennifer:
Yep, the whole thing. The seeds went it, the pepper seeds they aren’t going to cause any problems. Now I have this large container, organic apple cider vinegar with the mother still in it. Yeh, if it doesn’t have the mother still in it then it’s good for cleaning. I found this monster at one of those big club supply stores.

LeAura:
Like Costco or Sam’s Club?

Jennifer:
Yeah, so if mine has it, I’m sure yours will have it. It was affordable and you know it was certified organic.

LeAura:
Speaking of which, we were going to Sam’s and we recently went to Costco and they had a lot of organic options now.

Jennifer:
They do! Recently I went with my husband and we were pleased to see they had hemp seeds in here, this apple cider vinegar, we were just thrilled. We are seeing a lot and I believe it’s because people are demanding it more.

LeAura:
Yeah definitely!

Jennifer:
Which is wonderful! So I’m just going to do the same thing as with any extract. I’m going to fill the jar up, all the way to the top and make sure all the herbs and vegetables are covered. That’s important because you don’t want bacterial growth.

LeAura:
Ok so the only liquid is the apple cider vinegar, organic.

Jennifer:
Correct! That is it and then I’m going to take a lid. In this case I have a fun plastic lid which you can find online or sometimes in the food stores. You can find these in the canning section and that’s because vinegar can rust the metal tops that come standard with mason jars.

LeAura
It makes sense.

Jennifer:
Yeah. Actually it looks quite pretty right now.

fire cider recipe

LeAura
Yeah and speaking of the expense of plastic lids, in a way it isn’t though because you can reuse them, as opposed to the canning lids which you can’t.

Jennifer:
Yeah you really can. These are BPA free but I do still take pains to see that whatever I put in the container isn’t touching the plastic. It’s just a precaution I take, I remember reading a study where it noted you have less leaching when you just make sure that your food is not contacting the plastic lid on your Pyrex glassware, things like that.

LeAura:
Right, so you wouldn’t shake it, you would stir it instead?

Jennifer:
Exactly! I would stir it and I would open this up every couple of days to make sure that everything is underneath and not poking out. Supposed you find out you have to add a little more apple cider vinegar, that’s ok.  And although it’s pretty now it shall not remain so, the colour will start leaching out of these pretty vegetables and if you’re giving it away as a gift, do it quick! It will get a grey, green colour as time goes on. Two weeks from now, you can strain that off and it because a really nice, somewhat fierce, remedy for cold and flu. Which is probably why it’s called fire cider and it tastes to me, a little bit like, salad dressing taste before you put the oil in it.

LeAura:
In fact we’ve had some people, members of the Gardens All community, talk about using it as a part of salad dressing and for cooking as well.

Jennifer:
I don’t see why you couldn’t, if you’re going to do that then you might want to tailor the herbs to the taste that you’re going for. You know if you want to make a nice vinaigrette then you might want to take the ginger out. Use what you have. If I had oregano for example, I didn’t have any in my garden shockingly, it would have gone into the jar.

LeAura
Yeah that’s right because oregano oil is a good anti-viral and anti-biotic fungal as well.

Jennifer:
Exactly! It’s a really fantastic herb. A lot of the mint family herbs, you will find, are very anti-oxidant in nature and they have antimicrobial properties.

LeAura:
Sorry did you say mint family?

Jennifer:
Yeah I did. When you look at the mint family it’s actually huge. Something like peppermint and rosemary don’t look like they would be in the same family but they are. They tend to be hallmarked by being very high in antioxidants. Peppermint, you could put that in there. It might taste interesting but you certainly could. You might want to hold off on that and just make a tea (laughter), with the peppermint because that’s a much nicer way to get that into you and it helps with your sinuses.

 

Home remedies for cold and flu

How to Make Fire Cider

Ingredients:

  • 2 sprigs rosemary
  • 1 sprig sage
  • 2 inch piece (or 2 tablespoons) of ginger root
  • 2 inch piece (or one tablespoon) of horseradish
  • 2 cloves Garlic
  • 1 stem of sweet Basil
  • 2 jalapenos peppers (use sweet peppers if you suffer from heartburn, other illnesses or have a strong dislike for hot foods)
  • 2 chipotle peppers
  • 1/2 onion, diced
  • Large container of organic apple cider vinegar (with the “mother” still in there).

Method:

  1. Cut the garlic and let it sit for 2 minutes, then whack it with the flat of your blade to release the juice (mince if you like). Add it to a pint size mason jar.
  2. Chop up horseradish root, ginger root, sage, basil, rosemary and add this also to the mason jar.
  3. Chop up your peppers to fill up your mason jar, this includes the seeds and the stem.
  4. Pour the apple cider vinegar into the jar, making sure all the herbs and vegetables are covered. Use a plastic lid to seal the jar.
  5. Open the jar every couple of days to ensure all the herbs and vegetables are still covered by the liquid, feel free to top up the apple cider vinegar if need be. Occasionally stir the contents rather than shake so you get the least contamination from your plastic lid.
  6. After two weeks the jar colouring should look grey or green. Remove the herbs and vegetables by straining and keep the liquid as your herbal remedy.

 

home remedies for colds and flu
Fire Cider Recipe – image and recipe by Jennifer Capestany, PrairieHawkBotanica.com


LeAura:
Ok well that moves us right into our next topic but let me just ask one more question about the fire cider. So you said you let it sit for two weeks. You said basically use what you have, so what is it about it, medicinally, that makes it so effective? You said you use the herbs that are strong medicines in themselves and you just put the whole batch in there, is that it?

Jennifer:
Yeah, correct. It’s like the most unsophisticated way of making a remedy that I could think of. You’re just taking something that is already very cleansing to the body and can help cleanse the blood and most of the liver like apple cider vinegar and you’re adding to it, herbs that you know are anti-oxidants in nature, antiviral and immunomodulators like garlic. You’re sticking that all in a jar, letting it sit and taking it all by the teaspoonful once a day or every few hours if you actually feel a flu or cold coming on. So yeah, it’s a pretty quick and easy remedy, there’s not a lot of sophistication to it.

How to Make a Quick Facial Steam for a Stuffy Nose

LeAura:
Definitely, ok excellent! So then how about the next topic which is how to make a quick facial steam for stuffy noses?

Jennifer:
We have a video up in one of the cold and flu articles we’ve collaborated on,

LeAura:
Well find it and link to it. Here it is: Best Immune-Boosting Herbs for Cold and Flu.10)https://www.gardensall.com/best-immune-boosting-herbs-colds-flu/

Jennifer:
There’s a video that shows you how to use straight, plain chamomile flowers as a facial stream to help stuffy noses. Basically I’ve got a bowl here but envision if you boil water and then you pour that into a glass bowl or some kind of non-reactive. Something that’s not going to crack and break from heat and dump in a handful of chamomile flowers. Lavender comes to mind as another fine choice and you do it the old fashion way, you know when you’re trying to get rid of your pimples as a teenager and you have the towel over your head. (Laughter) Make sure you’ve got a box of tissues because chamomile is very good at unclogging congested airways. Lavender blossoms can also help with that, if you want something fiercer and that sounds too tame for you, do the same process and dump in good old rosemary or juniper berries. You can go out and grab some of those juniper berries and dump it in the bowl. Also pine needles, if you don’t have juniper trees you will probably have pine trees around somewhere.

Herbs Good for Congestion

  • Chamomile
  • Lavender
  • Rosemary
  • Juniper Berries
  • Pine Needles

Home remedies for colds and flu

LeAura:
Now, is that any kind of pine?

Jennifer:
Pretty much but the ones that are going to be really good are those resin, aromatic ones. You know the ones you can hardly touch without coming away sticky?

LeAura
Yeah!

Jennifer:
Those are going to be the ones that really give up a lot of their properties into that water which you then inhale up and help to really unclog. The rosemary and such, can really help if you have a bit of a sore throat or cough, it really just helps it get its medicine in there and right to where it’s needed.

LeAura:
So about how much of those herbs, like a tablespoon or a couple of tablespoons?

Jennifer:
You know I usually tell you to go by the handful, so again don’t get fussy but a handful. That’s probably about a cup.

LeAura:
I’ve always liked chamomile it has that nice apple blossom fragrance

Jennifer:
It’s nice and it also helps for children, if you come at them with the rosemary and the juniper berries and that fierce smelling facial stream then they run away from you. The chamomile might be a better choice to convince them to give it a try. That’s a nice calm one, its gentle and it’s safe for even young children, the chamomile facial steam. But if you’re really feeling clogged and you want a fierce one, you could also add ginger into that mix.

LeAura:
Yeah that’s a good idea! Maybe even garlic, no that wouldn’t be as pleasant!

Jennifer:
(Laughter) And then give everyone in the house a kiss because they’ll be loving that smell. So those are some good choices for a nice facial steam.

LeAura:
Very good, that’s good to know.

I lost another question I had so if it circles back around I will interrupt and ask you that one. So meanwhile, the last thing on our list for today, which is really good timing because we are getting close to wrapping up, is how to do the same for coughs? Oh I remember what I was going to ask you so back to the facial steam for stuffy noses. Often when we have a cold or a flu, Neti Pot, have you tried any of those herbs with the Neti Pot or would you just use salt?

Jennifer:
I usually don’t when it comes to Neti Pot. I usually suggest that people use the Neti Pot exactly the way the instructions direct which is just the distilled water, gently heated and the salts that come with it. Which are good mineral rich salts and the reason for that is because there is some small risk of infection if you mess around with it too much. Usually it’s only a risk if you don’t clear your hazardous airways after using the Neti Pot. Or if you have used water that’s not distilled but because of that I don’t usual combine in the way of herbs with the Neti Pot. If you do, go super gentle.

LeAura:
My thoughts are blipping so fast, here and there and it’s like ‘oh I’m going to ask her this’ and then I lose it. It evaporates like the air.

Jennifer:
Well I know you were worried about coughs, specifically because they personally bother you a lot. The sage honey is one really good remedy, in fact honey is a common factor in a lot of effective cough remedies for cold and flu. There’s ‘Three Ingredient Teas for Colds and Flu’, that’s another article that we worked on together and in there I showed you how to make my mom’s old cough remedy. Which combines tea with cloves and lemon, you could put some cloves in the fire cider too if you wanted.

LeAura:
Yeah that’s a good idea!

Jennifer:
That’s another good way to try and tamp down the cough, soothe the pain, try and calm those spasms and another good one is elderberry syrup. Good old elderberry syrup, easy to make, easy to buy and easy to find. That has actually been proven, studies have shown that not only does it shorten symptoms, the number of days that you have the flu, but it can also protect you from getting it in the first place. So when you combine that with honey or a little bit of glycerine that can turn into a very effective, all-around remedy and help with that cough. You would take it every few hours while you were feeling lousy.

LeAura:
So you would just do another honey infusion, put all those in a jar like we did with the sage?

Jennifer:
The elderberry syrup is usually cooked, you’re going to be making a syrup by combining honey and water, and the berries obviously. So what you’re doing is cooking the herbs, the elderberry, so what I like is to add ginger, cloves, and mint, into those. You let that cook a little bit down and squish it down and to that liquid after you have drained it off, you add an equal amount of honey.

LeAura:
So for instance we did an interview with Rodger Lenhardt of Norm’s Farms and they grow and sell elderberry plants as well as elderberry products and so if someone doesn’t have access to elderberry that’s certainly an option. They have a wellness syrup, so you can buy it pre-cooked down and add that. In which case you could just add that along with your herbs to the honey.

Jennifer:
Or follow the instructions on the bottle. It’s good to find a nice reputable source, I’ve seen some bottles of elderberry syrup in the market, even in some of the bargain markets and I didn’t much like what I saw. Definitely find a reputable dealer, organic is always best if you’re going to purchase it.

LeAura:
Definitely and I did remember. The train of thought finally came back to me, so it was to ask you if between the Neti Pot and the facial stream, have you tried both and do you find one more effective than the other?

Jennifer:
I find the facial steam to be less alarming (laughter) however the Neti Pot is really good at clearing out those sinuses if you’re clogged or if you’re feeling like there is a lot of build-up. The Neti Pots even good when you’re not suffering from cold and flu but say you have post nasal drip, allergy issues and you’re just a mess in there, really the Neti Pot is fantastic for that. So I don’t know if I would choose, anyone who’s capable of doing both, without feeling like they are drowning, you should do both.

LeAura:
(Laughter) That’s a really good point, funny way of putting it. So well put your links so people can contact you. I know you hold local workshops, herbal workshops, and holistic healing and help. People can also hire you online to work with like this, face to face via skype or whatever.

Jennifer:
Absolutely!

LeAura:
Ok so we will put your contact information and so the clients now on your site as I indicated. Your speciality is working with people in the areas of digestive disorder, autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis and chronic illness, which kind of sums it all up. So basically, is there anyone who you haven’t been able to help, who has come to you?

Jennifer:
My most challenging cases, to date, are thyroid disorders. They are so variable from one person to the next and you know what works for this one person doesn’t work for the next person. So those are probably the most challenging and the one condition, I hate to say, turn away but I really want the person contacting me to go to a clinic that specialises in natural interventions for this particular illness, would be cancer.

LeAura: Sure.

Jennifer:
Yeah because by the time you’ve discovered it, it’s usually quite far gone and I really would love it, if instead of just consulting your neighbourhood herbalist, is to consider going to one of these clinics. That can really monitor you, have all of the tools and the tests that they need right there to help you out. That’s one where I respectfully advise you to go see the next level of help, in naturopathic medicine. The most challenging, I’ve still managed but we’ve gotten so far with one client and then they plateau but those thyroid diseases can be very tough.

LeAura:
So, along those lines, whether it’s thyroid, candida, arthritis or actually pretty much anything, diet plays a big role. You have to emphasise that with your clients as well, right?

Jennifer:
Absolutely. In fact the diet is actually quite key. It’s probably the number one factor that’s going to bring you to the best health you can possibly have. The herbs don’t give you energy like sugar or fat, they don’t build muscle like protein. What they do is they nourish you, they pack vitamin and mineral punch. They have lots of other medicinal components to them that can help you but what they can do is help to mitigate symptoms while you then go and take the steps you need and the lifestyle changes you need to make, to go about real healing.

 

If you were to come to me, ‘oh I need a remedy for rheumatoid arthritis’, there is no bottle that I can give you that is going to cure you of your illness, your rheumatoid arthritis. You have to take those dietary changes and lifestyle changes, getting sun and getting exercise. If there’s toxicity of some kind, then you have to work to get that out. Yeah, diet is really top of the list of what needs to be done. You will not heal unless you are willing to make those changes to how you live and eat.

Diet is essential. You will not heal unless you are willing to make those changes to how you live and eat.

LeAura:
Right, because we can’t keep doing those same things that keep causing it and keep on doing that and expecting something else to alleviate that.

Jennifer:
Exactly. Herbs aren’t drugs, they will refuse to mask a poor lifestyle.

LeAura:
Well that’s a really good point and because drugs are often just a band aid that’s going to cover it up and then we will need another band aid to cover it up.

Jennifer:
In natural healing you have to be able to own yourself and love yourself and know that you’re worth those changes. Any change that’s required to bring you back and that’s usually one of the first steps, is getting them to value themselves and then feel empowered to go to the next step. Some many people don’t think they’re worth it.

LeAura:
And to think about your journey, to go from being so young basically in your mid-twenties to your mid-thirties, it’s almost like what is the horizon of your life. Right? When you’re going through that chronic illness and it just gets worse and worse. It can lead to severe depression, so to have come to the other side and basically saving your own life, and how gratifying that is to help other people. That’s powerful. Going from feeling helpless and like you said that slippery slope to basically feeling empowered and capable. And the challenge as it was for you, as it is for all of us takes more time. Which is why it’s so often easier to go to the pill bottle. But the remedies that we’ve talked about here today, really don’t take that much time and they are so much cheaper, and so much more effective!

Jennifer:
It’s true! And you’ve taken back a little bit of the control over your own health and your own medicine for you and your family. It’s worth it.

LeAura:
Absolutely. A hundred percent. Well Jennifer it’s been amazing getting to spend time with you. We’ve been talking on chats for a couple years, it seems like, so it was really great to get to have a face to face and learn from you. Thank you so much.

 

Jennifer:
Thank you. Happy to be here… my pleasure.

If you need an herbal consultation, you can reach Jennifer at PrairieHawkBotanica.com

Transcription by Georgia Smith, lightly edited. Video Duration: 1:02:05
Speakers: Jennifer Capestany, LeAura Alderson


References   [ + ]

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Jennifer is a clinical herbalist and health coach, specializing in autoimmune diseases like rheumatiod arthritis. Her interest in plant medicine led Jennifer to spend years studying herbology, physiology, and nutrition. She works one-on-one with her clients via her herbalist and health coaching business, Prairie Hawk Botanica. Jennifer lives on a homestead in rural Texas with her husband, 2 children, and various animals. In her spare time she loves to be in her large herb and vegetable garden. Sharing herb knowledge and her love of natural healing with others is her calling.