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Kale Married Brussel Sprout and Had Sweet and Nutty Kalettes

Have you heard of—or tried—Kalettes yet? If you enjoy Kale and Brussel Sprouts, this may be of interest.

We grew these last year, but they didn’t do so well, and froze with our first frost, even though they were under a cloche. If you’ve grown these successfully, please let us know.

Meanwhile, we’ll try again this year because we love brussels and kale and will keep you posted.

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Kalettes® are a brand new vegetable which looks a little like a tiny cabbage with green frilly leaves and streaks of purple. Kalettes have great flavor and can be cooked in a variety of ways, with a taste fusion of sweet and nutty. 1)

Kalettes can be sautéed, roasted, grilled or eaten raw.

Kalettes are the non-GMO product of 15 years of hard work and dedication (using traditional breeding techniques) from the British vegetable seed house Tozer Seeds. Developed through traditional hybridization and not genetic modification, Flower Sprouts as they are called in the U.K., made it’s way to the North America as Kalettes.

The inspiration behind Kalettes came from a desire to create a kale type vegetable which was versatile, easy to prepare and looked great. Crossing kale with brussels sprouts was a natural fit since they are both from the Brassica Oleracea species which also includes cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli.2)

Kalettes are a synthesis of the best from each “parent”, combining the beauty and zest of kale with the petite sweetness of the Brussel Sprout. Kalettes grow into a beautiful, more colorful open rosette, more like a miniature kale than the typical mini cabbage look of Brussel sprouts. The open, flower-like florets are ready when approximately 2″ in diameter.

Which Kalettes to Grow

For great taste and appearance all season long, you can choose from three bicolor varieties for different harvest slots.

3 Bicolor Varieties of Kalettes®

In 2016 we got our first kalette seeds from Amazon. They did okay but we only got one packet to see how they’d do, and they did fine but it was a small harvest.

In 2017 we ordered from Johnny’s seeds, and they didn’t do as well. They froze easily, even under a cloche, when the rest of the cruciferous veggies did fine.

We’ll try again this year… probably order from Amazon again.

For early season harvest, choose the Autumn Star Kalettes.
For mid season harvest, choose the Mistletoe Kalettes.
For late season harvest, choose the Snowdrop Kalettes.

From Johnny’s Seeds.

This looks like a great kalette recipe. Until we can buy—or harvest—our own Kalettes, we might try this recipe using a combination of kale and brussel sprouts!

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I’m LeAura Alderson, entrepreneur, ideator, media publisher, writer and editor of Pursuits in recent years have been more planting seeds of ideas for business growth more than gardening. However, I’ve always been interested in medicinal herbs and getting nutrition and healing from food over pharmacy. As a family we’re eager to dig more deeply into gardening and edible landscape for the love of fresh organic foods and self sustainability. We thoroughly enjoy and appreciate the creative ingenuity of the GardensAll community.